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Exchange Visitor Visa

1.       Overview

a.       Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Exchange visitor (J-1) visas are nonimmigrant visas for individuals approved to participate in exchange visitor programs in the United States.

2.       Exchange visitor categories include:

  1. Au pair and EduCare
  2.  Short-term Scholar
  3. Camp Counselor
  4.  Specialist
  5. Government Visitor
  6.  Student, college/university
  7. Intern
  8.  Student, secondary
  9. International Visitor (Dept. of State use)
  10.  Summer Work Travel
  11. Physician
  12.  Teacher
  13. Professor and Research Scholar
  14.  Trainee

3.       Exchange Visitor Pilot Programs:

  1. Summer Work Travel Pilot Program: Australians
  2. Summer Work Travel Pilot Program: New Zealanders
  3. Intern Work Travel Pilot Program: Irish
  4. WEST (Work, English Study, and Travel) Program: South Koreans

4.       Exchange Visitors cannot travel on the Visa Waiver Program or with Visitor Visas –

a.        Exchange visitors who are citizens of Visa Waiver Program (VWP) participating countries are not permitted to travel without a visa on the VWP, if their purpose of travel is to participate in an exchange visitor program, as explained below. For more information on the VWP, see Visa Waiver Program. Exchange visitors are not permitted to travel on business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas if their purpose is to participate in an exchange visitor program. All exchange visitors must travel to the United States with exchange visitor (J-1) visas.

5.       Acceptance in Exchange Visitor Program – 

a.        Before you can apply at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate for a J-1 visa, you must first apply for and be accepted into an exchange visitor program through a designated sponsoring organization. Visit the Department of State J-1 Visa Exchange Visitor Program website to learn about program requirements, regulations, and more.

When you are accepted into the exchange visitor program you plan to participate in, you will be enrolled in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Most J-1 Exchange Visitors must pay the SEVIS I-901 Fee. Visit the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) website to learn more about SEVIS and the SEVIS I-901 Fee.

6.       How to Apply

a.       There are several steps to apply for a visa. The order of these steps and how you complete them may vary at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you apply. Please consult the instructions available on the embassy or consulate website where you will apply.

b.       Complete the Online Visa Application

i.      Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application, Form DS-160 – Learn more about completing the DS-160. You must: 1) complete the online visa application and 2) print the application form confirmation page to bring to your interview.

ii.      Photo – You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. Your photo must be in the format explained in the Photograph Requirements.

7.       Schedule an Interview

a.       While interviews are generally not required for applicants of certain ages outlined above, consular officers have the discretion to require an interview of any applicant, regardless of age.

If you are age:

Then an interview is:

  • 13 and younger
  •         Generally not required
  • 14-79
  •          Required (some exceptions for renewals)
  • 80 and older
  •           Generally not required

b.       You must schedule an appointment for your visa interview, generally, at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the country where you live. You may schedule your interview at any U.S. Embassy or Consulate, but be aware that it may be difficult to qualify for a visa outside of your place of permanent residence. 

c.       Wait times for interview appointments vary by location, season, and visa category, so you should apply for your visa early. Review the interview wait time for the location where you will apply:

8.       Appointment Wait Time

Select a U.S. Embassy or Consulate:

Where will you apply (City)?:  _____________

9.   Prepare for Your Interview

a.       Fees - Pay the non-refundable visa application fee, if you are required to pay it before your interview. When your visa is approved, you may also pay a visa issuance fee, if applicable to your nationality. Fee information is provided below:  

10.   Application Fee

a.       $160

b.       Select your nationality to see Issuance Fee (country/authority or area):  ___________________

a.       Review the instructions available on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply to learn more about fee payment.

b.       NOTE: U.S. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are not required to pay application processing fees if participating in a Department of State, a U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), or a Federally funded educational and cultural exchange program which has a program serial number beginning with G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-7 printed on Form DS-2019, Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status. U.S. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are also not required to pay applicable issuance fees.
 

11.   Gather Required Documentation

a.       Gather and prepare the following required documents before your visa interview:

  i.      Passport valid for travel to the United States - Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your period of stay in the United States (unless exempt by country-specific agreements). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person who needs a visa must submit a separate application.

ii.      Nonimmigrant Visa Application, Form DS-160 confirmation page

iii.      Application fee payment receipt, if you are required to pay before your interview

iv.      Photo – You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. If the photo upload fails, you must bring one printed photo in the format explained in the Photograph Requirements

v.      Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status, Form DS-2019 – A SEVIS-generated Form DS-2019 is provided to you by your program sponsor after the sponsor enters your information in the SEVIS system. All exchange visitors, including their spouses and minor children, must be registered in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Each person receives a separate Form DS-2019.

vi.      Training/Internship Placement Plan, Form DS-7002 – In addition to the Form DS 2019, participants in the J-1 Trainee and Intern categories require Form DS-7002 (based on Box 7 on Form DS-2019). Learn more about the Trainee and Intern programs.

12.   Legal Rights and Protections

a.       You must read the Legal Rights and Protections pamphlet to learn about your rights in the United States and protection available to you. Review this important pamphlet before applying for your visa.

13.   Additional Documentation May Be Required

a.       Review the instructions for how to apply for a visa on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply. Additional documents may be requested to establish if you are qualified. For example, additional requested documents may include evidence of:

  • i.      The purpose of your travel;
  • ii.      Your intent to depart the United States after your travel;
  • iii.      Your ability to pay all travel costs; and/or
  • iv.      Other documents the consular officer may request.

b.       Evidence of your employment and/or your family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your travel and your intent to return to your home country. If you cannot cover all the costs for your travel, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all costs for your travel.

14.   Attend Your Visa Interview

a.       During your visa interview, a consular officer will determine whether you are qualified to receive a visa, and if so, which visa category is appropriate based on your purpose of travel. You will need to establish that you meet the requirements under U.S. law to receive the category of visa for which you are applying. 

b.       Ink-free, digital fingerprint scans will be taken as part of your application process. They are usually taken during your interview, but this varies based on location.

c.       After your visa interview, your application may require further administrative processing. You will be informed by the consular officer if further processing is necessary for your application.

d.       When the visa is approved, you will be informed how your passport with visa will be returned to you. Review the visa processing time, to learn how soon your passport with visa will generally be ready for pick-up or delivery by the courier.

15.   Two-year Home-Country Physical Presence Requirement

a.       When you agree to participate in an Exchange Visitor Program and your program falls under the conditions explained below, you will be subject to the two-year home-country physical presence (foreign residence) requirement. This means you will be required to return to your home country for two years at the end of your exchange visitor program. This requirement under immigration law is based on Section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

b.       Two-year Home-country Physical Presence Requirement Conditions - An exchange visitor is subject to the two-year home-country physical presence requirement if the following conditions exist:

  • i.      Government funded exchange program - The program in which the exchange visitor was participating was financed in whole or in part directly or indirectly by the U.S. government or the government of the exchange visitor's nationality or last residence;
  • ii.      Graduate medical education or training - The exchange visitor entered the United States to receive graduate medical education or training;
  • iii.      Specialized knowledge or skill: Skills List - The exchange visitor is a national or permanent resident of a country which has deemed the field of specialized knowledge or skill necessary to the development of the country, as shown on the Exchange Visitor Skills List. Review the Exchange Visitor Skills List 2009.

c.       Restrictions - When you, as an exchange visitor are subject to the two-year home-country physical presence requirement, you must return to your home country for a cumulative total period of at least two years before you can do any of the following:

  • i.      Change status while in the United States to the nonimmigrant categories of temporary worker (H) or intracompany transferee (L);
  • ii.      Adjust status while in the United States to immigrant visa/lawful permanent resident status (LPR);
  • iii.      Receive an immigrant visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate; or
  • iv.      Receive a temporary worker (H), intracompany transferee (L), or fiancé (K) visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

d.       Waiver of Two Year Home-Country Physical Presence Requirement - If you are not able to fulfill the home country presence requirement, you may be able to apply for a waiver. Select Waiver of the Exchange Visitor Two-Year Home-Country Physical Presence Requirement to learn more about this requirement and how to request a waiver.

16.   Entering the United States

a.       A visa allows a foreign citizen to travel to a U.S. port-of-entry (generally an airport) and request permission to enter the United States. A visa does not guarantee entry into the United States. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials at the port of entry have authority to permit or deny admission to the United States. If you are allowed to enter the United States, the CBP official will provide an admission stamp or paper Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record. Learn more about admissions and entry requirements, restrictions about bringing food, agricultural products, and other restricted/prohibited goods, and more by reviewing the CBP website.

b.       Additional Information: Exchange visitors have an additional 30 days after the program end date listed on Form DS-2019 for domestic travel in the United States and/or to prepare for and depart the United States.

17.   Extending Your Stay

a.       See Program Extension on the Department of State Exchange Visitor Program website to learn about requesting to extend your exchange visitor program beyond the date listed on your Form DS-2019.

b.       Learn about maintaining your exchange visitor status on the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement SEVP website under Maintaining Your Immigration Status While a Student or Exchange Visitor.

c.       Failure to depart the United States on time will result in you being out of status. Under U.S. law, visas of travelers who are out of status are automatically voided (Section 222(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act). If you had a multiple entry visa and it was voided due to you being out of status, it will not be valid for future entries into the United States. 

d.       Failure to depart the United States on time may also result in you being ineligible for visas you may apply for in the future. Review Visa Denials and Ineligibilities and Waivers: Laws to learn more.

18.   Change of Status

a.       While in the United States, you may be able to request that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) change your nonimmigrant status to another nonimmigrant category. See Change My Nonimmigrant Status on the USCIS website to learn more.

b.       Requesting a change of status from USCIS while you are in the United States and before your authorized stay expires does not require that you apply for a new visa. However, if you cannot remain in the United States while USCIS processes your change of status request, you must apply for a visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

c.       Additional Information

  • i.      We cannot guarantee that you will be issued a visa. Do not make final travel plans or buy tickets until you have a visa.
  • ii.      For information about employment, review Exchange Visitors and Employment Authorization on the USCIS website.
  • iii.      Spouse and children

1.       Your spouse and unmarried, minor children may be able to apply for J-2 visas to accompany or join you at a later date to reside with you during your J program, if permitted on your exchange program category. While SEVIS fee payment is not required, your sponsor must issue them separate DS-2019 Forms, which are required when they apply for their visas, along with a copy of the primary visa holder’s J-1 visa and proof of relationship.
2.       Your minor children are permitted to attend school while in the United States on J-2 visas and are not required to obtain student (F) visas

  • iv.      Unless canceled or revoked, a visa is valid until its expiration date. Therefore, a valid U.S. visa in an expired passport is still valid. If you have a valid visa in your expired passport, do not remove it from your expired passport. You may use your valid visa in your expired passport along with a new valid passport for travel and admission to the United States. 

Intern Work Travel Pilot Program: Irish

1.       Guidelines for Administration of the Intern Work and Travel Pilot Program with Ireland

a.        The Department is pleased to announce that on September 22, 2008 the Government of Ireland and the Government of the United States signed a Memorandum of Understanding establishing the Intern Work and Travel (IWT) Pilot Program. This innovative reciprocal exchange program will be conducted as a five year pilot program under which qualifying post-secondary college/university students and recent graduates from Ireland will enter the United States to participate in internships and travel independently. The Government of Ireland will provide reciprocal opportunities for U.S. participants. The IWT Program becomes effective on October 31, 2008.

b.        The IWT program will be conducted under the existing Intern category of the Exchange Visitor Program, unless otherwise noted below.

2.       Program Administration

a.       Citizens of Ireland traveling to the United States to participate in the IWT Pilot program will do so under the Department’s existing Intern category regulations, and applicable sponsor program rules, with the exception of participant placement. IWT participants should be notated as such in the Subject/Field Code Remarks Box of Form DS-2019. No extension of program beyond the 12-month program duration will be permitted.

3.       Participant Placement

a.        Form DS-7002, Training/Internship Placement Plan, is not required for the purpose of the visa application as participants may enter the United States without regard to preplacement. Sponsors will be responsible for completing this Form when participants advise them of their employment arrangement.

4.        Screening and Selection of Participants

a.       Screening and selection of participants is the responsibility of designated sponsors and may be conducted by the sponsor or in cooperation with the sponsor’s overseas partners/agents. All participants must be interviewed in-person and must meet the following program eligibility requirements:

  • i.      Be a citizen of Ireland.
  • ii.      Be a bona fide post-secondary college/university student or recent graduate. A recent graduate is defined as an Irish citizen who has graduated from a post-secondary college/university in their home country no more than 12 months beyond graduation. The applicant must provide evidence from his/her post-secondary institution of student status or graduation.
  • iii.       Vocational students pursuing studies at a tertiary level accredited academic institution are not eligible for participation unless such vocational study is part of a structured 2 program leading to a degree or other credential recognized as equivalent to Level VI of the Irish Higher Education System.
  • iv.      Provide proof of sufficient financial resources, prior to the issuance of a Form DS-2019 coming to the United States, to support themselves throughout their program and for their return home.
  • v.      Not be accompanied by spouse or dependents.

5.       Monitoring of Participants and Participant Support

a.       Within 10 days of arrival in the United States, interns are required to notify the sponsor of their arrival, their U.S. residential address, and confirm the commencement of their program or job search. After receiving the participants’ information, the sponsor must validate the participant’s SEVIS record and reflect the current U.S. address and primary site of activity. Sponsors shall continue to contact participants and host organizations every 30 days thereafter throughout the duration of their participation in the sponsor’s program. Sponsors shall promptly update SEVIS with any changes of U.S. address or approved changes of site of activity. Sponsors are reminded to identify the “primary” site of activity in the event the participant has multiple sites.

Summer Work Travel Pilot Program- Australians

1.       Overview

a.       The United States welcomes foreign citizens who come to the U.S. to participate in exchange programs. Before applying for a visa, all exchange visitor applicants are required to be accepted and approved by an authorized program sponsor. When accepted, the applicant will receive from the educational institution or program sponsors the necessary approval documentation to be submitted when applying for a visa.

b.       The exchange visitor program's J visa is designed to promote the interchange of persons, knowledge, and skills in the fields of education, arts, and sciences. Participants include students at all academic levels; trainees obtaining on-the-job training with firms, institutions, and agencies; teachers of primary, secondary, and specialized schools; professors coming to teach or do research at institutions of higher learning; research scholars; professional trainees in the medical and allied fields; and international visitors coming for the purpose of travel, observation, consultation, research, training, sharing, or demonstrating specialized knowledge or skills, or participating in organized people-to-people programs.

2.       Dependents

a.       Spouses or unmarried children under the age of 21 who wish to accompany or join the principal visa holder of a J-1 visa to the United States for the duration of his/her stay must have J-2 visas. Spouses or children who do not intend to reside in the United States with the principal visa holder, but who will visit for vacations only, may be eligible to apply for visitor (B-2) visas or to travel on the Visa Waiver Program.

b.       The spouse and/or child of an exchange visitor in the U.S. may not work while holding a J-2 visa unless they have filed Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) must have reviewed the Form I-765 and given permission to the J-2 holder to work. The USCIS website has a PDF document titled "Employment Authorization" that has more details.

3.       Application Items

a.       To apply for a J visa, you must submit the following:

  • i.      A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 webpage for more information about the DS-160.
  • ii.      A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • iii.      One (1) 2"x2" (5cmx5cm) photograph. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • iv.      Unless your J program is sponsored by the United States Government (with a program code beginning with a "G"), you must present a receipt showing payment of your US$160 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee, paid in local currency. This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State's website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.
  • v.      An approved DS-2019 from your U.S. program.
  • vi.      You must pay your Form I-901 SEVIS fee. The SEVIS website has more information. Applicants participating in a U.S. Government sponsored program (programs whose codes begin with G-1, G-2, G-3, G-7) are not required to pay the SEVIS fee.

b.       In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

4.       How to Apply

a.       Step 1

i.      Pay the visa application fee.

b.       Step 2

i.      Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

c.       Step 3

i.      Schedule your appointment on this web page. You will need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • 1.       Your passport number
  • 2.       The date you paid your fee (either at Australia Post or online by credit card)
  • 3.       The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page

d.       Step 4

i.      Visit the U.S. Consulate on the date and time of your visa interview. You will need to bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, one recent photograph, your current and all old passports, and the original visa fee payment receipt. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

5.       Supporting Documents

a.       Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

b.       Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is a concern, you should bring your documents to the Consulate in a sealed envelope. The Consulate will not make your information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of your information.

c.       You should bring the following documents to your interview. Original documents are always preferred over photocopies and you must bring these documents with you to the interview. Do not fax, email or mail any supporting documents to the U.S. Embassy/Consulate.

  • i.      Documents demonstrating strong financial, social, and family ties to your home country that will compel you to return to your country after your program of study in the U.S. ends.
  • ii.      Financial and any other documents you believe will support your application and which give credible evidence that you have enough readily-available funds to meet all expenses for the first year of study and that you have access to funds sufficient to cover all expenses while you remain in the United States.
  • iii.      Photocopies of bank statements will not be accepted unless you can also show original copies of bank statements or original bank books.
  • iv.      If you are financially sponsored by another person, bring proof of your relationship to the sponsor (such as your birth certificate), the sponsor's most recent original tax forms and the sponsor's bankbooks and/or fixed deposit certificates.
  • v.      Academic documents that show scholastic preparation. Useful documents include school transcripts (original copies are preferred) with grades, public examination certificates (A-levels, etc.), standardized test scores (SAT, TOEFL, etc.), and diplomas.

6.       Supporting Documents for Dependents

a.       If you have dependents, you must also provide:

  • i.      Proof of your relationship to your spouse and/or child (e.g., marriage and birth certificates).
  • ii.      Each spouse or child must have their own Form DS-2019. This form is used to obtain the visa required for the spouse/child to enter the U.S. with you as the principal holder of an exchange visitor visa, or to join you in the U.S. at a later date.

Summer Work Travel Pilot Program- New Zealanders

1.       New Zealand and Australia 12-Month Work and Travel Program

a.       Since 2007 the United States has allowed post-secondary students or recent graduates who are New Zealand or Australian citizens to work and travel in the United States for up to twelve months.  New Zealand and Australia are the only two countries in the world with this arrangement.  The aim of the program is to offer young Kiwis the chance to experience the United States not just as a holiday destination, but as a potential place to study, as well as to improve cultural ties.

b.      Eligibility criteria for participants are noted below.

  • i.      Be a citizen of New Zealand.
  • ii.      Be a bona fide post-secondary student or recent graduate. To be considered a bona fide post-secondary student, the potential participant must have completed his/her freshman (first) year. A recent graduate is defined as a New Zealand citizen who has graduated from a (post-secondary) college/university in their home country within the last 12 months. The applicant must provide evidence of student status.
  • iii.      Vocational students pursuing studies at a tertiary level accredited educational institution are eligible for participation.
  • iv.      Provide proof of sufficient financial resources, prior to coming to the United States, to support themselves during a search for employment or between breaks in employment.

c.       For New Zealand citizens coming to the United States, this program will operate under the current Exchange Visitor Program Summer Work Travel regulations and in accordance with the guidelines provided to each designated sponsor.

d.       The new program will enable New Zealand tertiary students to work and travel in the United States for up to a year.

e.       A list of designated sponsors, as well as other information about the student work and travel program, is available from the following website, under the category Summer Work/Travel: website link.

2.       Do I Need A Visa?

a.       The U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) provides several categories of non-immigrant visas for those who want to visit or work temporarily in the United States.

b.       You can find out more about each type of visa from the travel.state.gov website, or by clicking on the Visa Types below. To Apply for a Visa, follow the steps above.

c.       Study & Exchange Visa Types:

  • i.      F
  • ii.      M
  • iii.      J

d.       Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. You must have a student visa to study in the United States. Your course of study and the type of school you plan to attend determine whether you need an F-1 visa or an M-1 visa.

To enter the United States to attend:

You need the following visa category:

  • University or college
  • High School
  • Private elementary school
  • Seminary
  • Conservatory
  • Another academic institution, including a language training program
  • Vocational or other recognized nonacademic institution, other than a language training program

e.       Students cannot travel on the Visa Waiver Program or with Visitor Visas

i.      Citizens of Visa Waiver Program (VWP) participating countries who intend to study cannot travel on the VWP or on visitor (B) visas, except to undertake recreational study as part of a tourist visit. Students must travel to the United States with student (F-1 or M-1) visas. For more information on the VWP, see Visa Waiver Program.

f.        For short periods of recreational study, a Visitor (B) visa can be used

i.      Enrollment in a short recreational course of study, which is not for credit toward a degree or academic certificate, is permitted on a visitor (B) visa. Learn more about Visitor Visas.

ii.      Study leading to a U.S. conferred degree or certificate is not permitted on a visitor (B) visa, even if it is for a short duration. For example, distance learning which requires a period of time on the institution’s U.S. campus requires an F-1 visa.

g.       Student Acceptance at a SEVP Approved School

i.      Before you can apply at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate for an F or M student visa, you must first apply to and be accepted by a SEVP approved school. Visit the Department of State EducationUSAwebsite to learn about educational opportunities for undergraduate and graduate study, opportunities for scholars, admissions, and more. You can also visit the DHSStudy in the States school search page to search for SEVP-certified schools.

ii.      When you are accepted by the U.S. school you plan to attend, you will be enrolled in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). You must pay the SEVIS I-901 Fee. The U.S. school will provide you with a Form I-20 to present to the consular officer when you attend your visa interview. If your spouse and/or children intend to reside with you in the United States while you study, they must obtain individual Form I-20s, but they do not pay the SEVIS fee. Visit the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)website to learn more about SEVIS and the SEVIS I-901 Fee.

3.       How To Apply?

a.       If you need a visa, you must schedule an appointment for a visa interview, following the five steps outlined below. Your visa eligibility can only be determined by an officer of the Auckland Consulate General at an interview.

b.       We encourage you to apply early, as there can be a wait time for a visa appointment during peak times of the year, and some cases require additional administrative processing that the Consulate is not able to waive. Applying two weeks before your intended travel date is generally sufficient to complete all necessary processing, but complicated cases can take longer.

c.       You can find the current wait time for a visa appointment and processing at the Consulate General in Auckland on the Visa Wait Time section of travel.state.gov.

d.       Find out about the New Zealand and Australia 12-Month Work and Travel Program here..

e.       ***NOTICE: There is a new policy regarding eyeglasses.  Effective for applications filed on or after November 1, 2016, eyeglasses must not be worn in a photo for a visa application, except in rare circumstances when eyeglasses cannot be removed for medical reasons, e.g. the applicant has recently had ocular surgery and the eyeglasses are necessary to protect the applicant’s eyes. In such a case, a medical statement signed by a medical professional must be provided.  Thank you for your compliance.***

f.        Step 1: Required Documents and Photos

i.      ALL nonimmigrant visa applicants are required to fill in the online application form (DS-160). Once completed, the information in the DS-160 will be electronically transmitted. The applicant must then print the confirmation page that includes some biographical information and a bar code confirmation number. Applicants must bring the DS-160 Confirmation Page to their interview.

ii.      NOTE – As you complete the visa application, save a copy on your hard drive and ‘save’ often. Fill out all required information completely and correctly, including selecting the appropriate visa type. Significant errors or information marked as “N/A”, “Nil”, etc. may result in your application being rejected at the time of your interview. This would require you to complete the entire application again and to reschedule your interview.

iii.      You will need one passport-sized photograph that is less than six months old. The photo should be in color, 2 inches x 2 inches (5 x 5 cm) on a plain background. It should be a front view, showing your full face. You can find details on photo requirements here. ***NOTICE: There is a new policy regarding eyeglasses.  Effective for applications filed on or after November 1, 2016, eyeglasses must not be worn in a photo for a visa application, except in rare circumstances when eyeglasses cannot be removed for medical reasons, e.g. the applicant has recently had ocular surgery and the eyeglasses are necessary to protect the applicant’s eyes. In such a case, a medical statement signed by a medical professional must be provided.  Thank you for your compliance.***

iv.      Certain visa classes require original, official documents provided by your sponsor in the U.S.:

  • 1.       Student (F) visa applicants must have an I-20 from the intended school;
  • 2.       Exchange visitor (J) visa applicants must have a DS-2019 from the program sponsor;
  • 3.       Acceptance letter from your visa sponsor and/or copy of your job placement letter in the U.S., if applicable;
  • 4.       If your J program requires that you are enrolled full-time at a tertiary institution, a letter from your institution confirming your full-time student status or a copy of your transcripts (unofficial web version is fine.)
  • 5.       Work visa (H, L, O, P, Q, R) applicants must have an I-797 approved petition notice, although a legible photocopy is acceptable.

v.      You will be required to prove to the satisfaction of the Consular Officer that you do not intend to remain in the U.S. after your legitimate purpose of travel has ended. This may require demonstrating strong social, economic, family and financial ties to New Zealand. It may be necessary to provide some of the following:

  • 1.       Letters of employment;
  • 2.       Proof of ongoing academic studies;
  • 3.       Proof of funds, i.e. bank statements, asset statements;
  • 4.       Evidence of ownership of property.
  • 5.       If visiting relatives, it is helpful to show that they are themselves in the U.S. in legal status.

vi.      Please note that supporting documents can vary from person to person depending on your personal situation.

g.       Step 2: Pay application fee

i.      Every applicant must pay the non-refundable, Machine-Readable Visa (MRV) application fee. You can pay the fee online with a credit card or in person at Kiwibank in New Zealand Post Shops.

ii.      The fees page of this site has a schedule of the current fees for different services.

 iii.      Online Payment with a Credit Card

  • 1.       The most convenient payment method for your nonimmigrant visa application fee is online with a credit card. By clicking below to proceed with a credit card payment, the cardholder acknowledges that this is a non-refundable visa application processing fee required as a prerequisite to the processing of an application. Furthermore, the cardholder agrees explicitly that there is no refund possible regardless of the outcome of this application. The amount to be charged to the card is payment of the non-refundable application processing fee by or on behalf of the applicant and does not in itself indicate the existence of a contract with the applicant, nor does it guarantee a successful application.
  • 2.       The New Zealand Dollar amounts on the payment page are based on the consular currency exchange rate determined by the U.S. Department of State. Applicants who do not pay the correct fee for their visa type may be restricted from scheduling an interview.
  • 3.       After you have paid the visa application fee, print your receipt number for your records. Save your receipt number. It cannot be replaced if it is lost. You will not be able to schedule an appointment without your receipt number.

 iv.      Payment in Person

1.       Any nonimmigrant visa applicant in New Zealand can pay their visa application fee with cash, credit card, or debit card at any New Zealand Post. Before going to a Post Shop, you must print and carry the applicable U. S. deposit slip available below on this page. Take the printed deposit slip with you to pay your fee. Upon payment, you will receive a receipt. Save your receipt. It cannot be replaced if it is lost. You will not be able to schedule an appointment without your receipt number.

2.       Select the deposit slip (PDF) that matches your visa application fee from the list below. Values are shown in U.S. dollars. This page has more information about the different visa application fees. Please note, the deposit slips are not compatible with the iPad and will not load correctly using the default Apple .pdf reader. The slips will load correctly on Apple computers if opened using Adobe Reader. If you cannot open or view the deposit slip, please download and install the latest version of Adobe Reader from the Adobe website. There is no fee to download or use Adobe Reader.

3.       After you have paid the visa application fee, keep the New Zealand Post receipt for your records. Save your receipt. It cannot be replaced if it is lost. You will not be able to schedule an appointment without your receipt number.

4.       All applicants for F, M or J visas must also pay the SEVIS Fee by credit card at http://www.fmjfee.com/.  Be sure to print a copy of your receipt and bring it with you to the interview.

5.       Also, note that if you are not traveling on a passport from New Zealand, Samoa, Great Britain, or Korea, you may have to pay an additional fee, known as a reciprocity fee.  These fees must be paid at the Consulate General, either by certified bank check or cash (U.S. or New Zealand currency is accepted.)  You will be informed of any additional fees at the time of the interview. You may also check the web site of the Bureau of Consular Affairs for more information.

 h.      Step 3 - Make appointment for interview

i.      All first-time nonimmigrant visa applicants are required to appear at the Consulate General in Auckland for a personal interview. Some applicants renewing their visas, as well as all official and diplomatic travelers on official business, are exempt from the personal appearance requirement and may apply for their visa by mail.

ii.      Important Notice! After paying a nonimmigrant visa application fee, you must wait to schedule your appointment

iii.      If you pay at New Zealand Post, schedule your interview at any time four hours after making payment. If you make payment at New Zealand Post on a Saturday, schedule your interview at any time after 12 noon the following Monday.

iv.      To make an appointment, applicants can schedule an appointment through the online appointment website http://www.ustraveldocs.com/nz or via call center (+64) 9 887 5999.

v.      In certain circumstances, you can request an expedited appointment if there is not an available appointment as early as you need.  If you meet any of the following criteria, please call the U.S. Visa Information Service and ask for an expedited appointment:

  • 1.       To attend the funeral of an immediate family member;
  • 2.       Medical emergency;
  • 3.       Fulbright scholars;
  • 4.       Member of cultural group replacing an original member due to illness/unforeseen contingency;
  • 5.       J1 and F1 visa applicants who received DS-2019 or I-20 form less than 14 days before program is due to start;
  • 6.       Unexpected, time sensitive business travel significant to U.S. economic interest;
  • 7.       Journalists traveling to cover fast-breaking news.

vi.      Please note: If you are coming to New Zealand from the Pacific Islands to apply for your visa, please be sure to make an appointment before arranging your travel.  The New Zealand consular district includes New Zealand, Samoa and the Cook Islands. Residents of Tonga should apply in the U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji, which has responsibility for Tonga.  For more information on applying for a visa at the U.S. Embassy in Apia, please visit their web site.

 i.        Step 4 Gather Supporting Documents   

i.      Certain visa classes require original, official documents provided by your sponsor in the U.S.:

  • 1.       Student (F) visa applicants must have an I-20 from the intended school;
  • 2.       Exchange visitor (J) visa applicants must have a DS-2019 from the program sponsor;
  • 3.       Acceptance letter from your visa sponsor and/or copy of your job placement letter in the U.S., if applicable;
  • 4.       If your J program requires that you are enrolled full-time at a tertiary institution, a letter from your institution confirming your full-time student status or a copy of your transcripts (unofficial web version is fine.)
  • 5.       Work visa (H, L, O, P, Q, R) applicants must have an I-797 approved petition notice, although a legible photocopy is acceptable.

ii.      You will be required to prove to the satisfaction of the Consular Officer that you do not intend to remain in the U.S. after your legitimate purpose of travel has ended. This may require demonstrating strong social, economic, family and financial ties to New Zealand. It may be necessary to provide some of the following:

  • 1.       Letters of employment;
  • 2.       Proof of ongoing academic studies;
  • 3.       Proof of funds, i.e. bank statements, asset statements;
  • 4.       Evidence of ownership of property.
  • 5.       If visiting relatives, it is helpful to show that they are themselves in the U.S. in legal status.

iii.      Please note that supporting documents can vary from person to person depending on your personal situation.

j.        Step 5 Attend Interview

  • i.      Submit the above documents in person on your designated appointment date.
  • ii.       
  • iii.      If approved, applicants receive their passport and visa by mail. This usually takes 3-4 business days, but can take longer, depending on individual circumstances. Arrival after mailing is dependent on the New Zealand postal system. As it is registered mail, an adult will have to be home to sign for receipt of the package.
  • iv.       
  • v.      The Consulate General cannot be held responsible for extra costs due to changing tickets or rebooking flights if delivery is delayed. We therefore strongly urge you not to purchase tickets until you have received your visa and passport in the mail. When you have received your visa it is important to check it. Please take some time to  read our frequently asked questions page..

4.       Where To Apply?

a.       All nonimmigrant visa applicants between the ages of 14 and 79 must appear in person at the Consulate General in Auckland for an interview and finger scanning as part of the application process.

b.       In some instances, applicants younger than 14 or older than 79 may be subject to an interview by a consular officer. Once applications are received for applicants younger than 14 or older than 79, the Consulate General will inform you if a personal appearance is necessary.

c.       All applicants, including those who wish to request an emergency appointment, must schedule an appointment through Visa Information Service or by calling +64 9 887 5999.

d.       A, G and NATO visa applicants (official and diplomatic visa applicants) are exempt from both of these requirements.

e.       We do not accept walk-in applicants nor is it possible to make an appointment by calling the Consulate or the Embassy directly.

f.        If you have previously been issued a U.S. Visa, you may be eligible for the Fingerprint Reuse/Reissuance program and not have to personally appear. You can refer to the Visa Renewal section.

5.       Fees

a.       Every applicant must pay the non-refundable, Machine-Readable Visa (MRV) application fee. You can pay the fee online with a credit card or in person at Kiwibank in New Zealand Post Shops.

b.       The  fees page of this site has a schedule of the current fees for different services.

c.       NOTICE: Effective Monday, September 21, 2015, the Currency Exchange Rate in use by the Consular Section will adjust to 1.5.  Please be advised there is no change to the US$ cost of services. 

d.       Please be advised that Machine Readable Visa (MRV) fees are non-refundable.

e.       If you have made a credit card payment and have not made a note of the receipt number to schedule an appointment please call 09 887599 or email support-newzealand@ustraveldocs.com  to retrieve your receipt number.

f.        DO NOT PAY THE FEE A SECOND TIME. YOU WILL NOT BE REFUNDED.

  • i.      The U.S. Consulate General does not accept U.S. cash; all fees must be paid in New Zealand dollars.
  • ii.      All applicants for a non-immigrant visa must pay the appropriate non-refundable, Machine Readable Visa (MRV) fee as outlined below.
  • iii.      All fees are non-refundable and are subject to change without notice. Kiwibanks in New Zealand Post Shops accept cash, or EFTPOS.
  • iv.      K visas are only payable at the Consulate.

g.       Effective March 1, 2015 the following fee schedule will apply:

Visa Type

MRV Fee amount (USD)

  • Business/Tourism  (B1/B2)
  • $160
  • Transit Visa, Crew-Airline/Ship  (C1, C1/D)
  • $160
  • Treaty trader/Investor  (E1/E2)
  •  $205
  • Specialty work visa for Australians (E3/E3D)
  •  $205
  • Academic Students (F1/F2)
  •  $160
  •  Temporary Employment (H1B/H2A/H2B/H3/H4)
  •  $190
  •  Media Visa (I)
  •  $160
  •  Exchange Visitors (J1/J2)
  •  $160
  •  Fiancé Visa (K1)
  •  $265
  •  Intra-company Transferee (L1/L2)
  •  $190
  •  Vocational Student (M1/M2)
  •  $160
  •  Person of Extraordinary Ability (O1/O2/O3)
  •  $190
  •  Performance Visa (P1/P2/P3/P4)
  •  $190
  •  Cultural Exchange Visitor (Q1)
  • $190
  •  Religious Worker (R1/R2)
  • $190

h.       Additional fees: Certain countries must pay an additional reciprocity fee.  Please contact the U.S. Visa Information Service on +64 9 887 5999 for further information.

6.       Case Status

  • a.       Some cases require additional administrative processing.  If you recently attended a visa interview and your application was temporarily refused under 221(g) and you received the “Administrative Processing” handout at the interview, you can check the status of your case on-line.  The case status report will be updated periodically.  The review of your application may take more than 6-8 months to complete.  In some cases, processing can take six months or longer, so if your case is not yet listed, please check back periodically for the latest information.
  • b.       Find your Batch No. in the case status report and note the case Status. There are only four case status remarks: Pending; Email Sent (Date); Send Passport (PPT) and Processed. Each remark is explained below and instructions are given where applicable.
  • c.       Pending:  Your case is still pending administrative processing. The Consulate General cannot issue you a visa before completion of this process. The Consulate General cannot waive this processing or influence the amount of time this processing may take. Please do not contact the Consulate General while your application is being processed as we will not be able to assist you.
  • d.       Email Sent: The Consulate General needs additional information from you in order to finish processing your case. The Consulate General has emailed or telephoned you regarding this information. You must submit this information to the Consulate General before your case can be completed. If your case status is EMAIL SENT, but that email was never received, please contact our Call Center on +64 9 887 5999 and let them know that you need to email the Consulate General regarding this information.
  • e.       Send Passport (PPT): You are required to submit your passport for issuance of the visa. Submit your passport along with a self addressed courier bag or you can use the drop box facility at the Consulate General, Auckland.
  • f.        Processed: The visa has been issued, or the case is closed and no action can be taken at this time. If the visa is issued, it will be returned within approximately 3-4 days.
  • g.       You can track the progress of your passport, once it has been picked up from our office by the courier company, on-line by visiting http://www.ustraveldocs.com/nz.

WEST (West, English Study, and Travel) Program: South Koreans

1.       Guidelines for Administration of the WEST (Work, English Study, and Travel) Program Eighteen-Month Intern Pilot Program

a.        The Department is pleased to announce that on September 22, 2008 the Government of the Republic of Korea and the Government of the United States signed a Memorandum of Understanding establishing an eighteen month work, English language instruction and travel program to be known as the WEST (Work, English Study, and Travel) Program. This innovative reciprocal exchange program will be conducted as a five year pilot program under which qualifying university students and recent graduates from the Republic of Korea will enter the United States to study English, participate in internships, and travel independently. The Government of the Republic of Korea will provide reciprocal opportunities for U.S. participants under its Working Holiday Program (WHP). The WEST Program becomes effective on October 31, 2008.

b.       The first five months of the WEST Program are devoted to structured English language training (at least 450 classroom hours provided by an accredited language school or university). While pursuing language instruction, participants will also take coursework in American business practices and gain familiarity with business procedures, corporate culture, and general office management issues. Upon completion of these educational requirements, participants will begin a work-based internship of up to twelve month’s duration with a corporate, non-profit, academic or other employer. Upon conclusion of the internship, participants may have the opportunity to travel for one month. The WEST program will be conducted under the existing intern category of the Exchange Visitor Program, unless otherwise noted below.

2.       Designation

a.       Sponsors approved to participate in the WEST Pilot will receive a separate program designation under which the Pilot Program will be administered.

b.       Sponsors currently designated for an internship program must apply for a new designation for the Pilot Program. There is no fee required for existing intern sponsors completing an application. Organizations that do not hold an internship designation may submit an application for participation in the WEST pilot program (payment of the $1,748 application fee will be required).

c.       Both existing sponsors and new intern program applicants must complete the Form DS- 3036, Exchange Visitor Program Application via SEVIS. In completing the Form, please:

  • i.       Indicate an estimate of the number of participants expected for the initial 18-month period of the Pilot.
  • ii.      For current internship sponsors, complete questions 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 of the Form DS- 3036 with the following information: 2
  • iii.       18-Month Pilot Proposal Submitted to Department of State (DoS). See P-X-XXXXX for additional Intern program information and documentation (current Program Number assigned to the current Intern program).
  • iv.       New applicants must complete questions 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 entirely.
  • v.       The Application must be signed, notarized and submitted to Department of State (DoS), Office of Exchange Coordination and Designation - Private Sector Programs Division, 301 4 th Street SW, Room 734, Washington DC 20547. The completed Form DS-3036 must be accompanied by a Program proposal that explains fully the details of the sponsor’s intended approach of administering the WEST program. The materials should include the name and address of your agent/partner organizations in Korea, a copy of any agreement(s) with your partner organizations, identification of staff to operate the pilot program, and a breakdown of all costs and fees to be paid by participants.

3.       Program Administration

a.       Citizens of the Republic of Korea traveling to the United States to participate in the WEST Pilot program will do so under the Department’s existing Intern Program regulations, and applicable sponsor program rules. There are some aspects of program administration that deviate from the current 12-month Intern Program requirements (e.g., selection and screening criteria, program content, program length, program costs, program supervision, and reporting requirements).

4.       Screening and Selection of Participants

a.        Screening and selection of participants is the responsibility of designated sponsors and may be conducted by the sponsor or in cooperation with the sponsor’s overseas partners/agents. All participants must be interviewed in-person and must meet the following program eligibility requirements:

  • i.      Be a citizen of the Republic of Korea.
  • ii.      Be approved for participation by the Republic of Korea.
  • iii.      Be a bona fide post-secondary student or recent graduate. A recent graduate is defined as a Korean citizen who has graduated from a post-secondary college/university in their home country no more than 12 months beyond graduation. The applicant must provide evidence from his/her post-secondary institution of student status or graduation.
  • iv.      Vocational students pursuing studies at a tertiary level accredited academic institution are not eligible for participation.
  • v.      Provide proof of sufficient financial resources, prior to coming to the United States, to support themselves throughout their program and for their return home.
  • vi.      Not be accompanied by spouse or dependents.

5.       Pre-Arrival Material Sponsors must state in their Pre-arrival Material

a.       that participants cannot be accompanied by their spouse or dependents.

6.       Program Costs

a.       Sponsors must ensure that program costs to participants are comparable to Americans participating in the Republic of Korea’s 18-Month Working Holiday Program. Sponsors shall provide participants a cost breakdown of the following: 3 Program and Administrative Fees (including fees to be paid to foreign agents/partners):

  • i.       SEVIS I-901 Fee:
  • ii.      MRV Fee:
  • iii.      Insurance Costs:
  • iv.       Approximate Cost of (Round Trip) Air Fare:
  • v.      In Country Travel Costs:
  • vi.      Educational Requirements
  • vii.      Cost of Living expenses
  • viii.      Other costs that exchange visitors will likely incur while in the United States:

7.       Participant Placement

a.       Sponsors must complete Form DS-7002 – Training/Internship Placement Plan. Phase I must be completed and signed prior to issuance of Form DS-2019. Phase I must reflect the location of the English language and coursework. Phase II may be added or amended to reflect the internship location after arrival in the United States.

i.      Phase I – Five months English language training (at least 450 classroom hours at an accredited language school or university). While pursuing language instruction, participants should also take coursework in American business practices and gain familiarity with business procedures, corporate culture, and general office management issues.

ii.      Phase II – Twelve-month Internship with a corporate, non-profit, academic or other employer.

  • 1.       Sponsors shall ensure that the internship being offered is viable and that participants’ pay is commensurate with that offered to Americans, confirm pay, number of work hours per week, supervision/oversight, and other details with employers as necessary.
  • 2.        Internship must be in the student’s field of study.

iii.       Phase III – Travel for up to one month. Form DS-2019 issuance When the Form DS-7002 has been completed, sponsors shall follow the following steps in issuing Forms DS-2019:

  • 1.       Create SEVIS records for a 12-month program. DO NOT PRINT THE FORM.
  • 2.       The day following the creation of the 12-month SEVIS record, print the Form DS-2019. The printed Form will reflect the 18-month maximum pilot program duration.
  • 3.       Sign the Form, in blue ink, and forward it to the potential participant in order to permit the individual to pay the SEVIS I-901 Fee and apply for a J-visa at the American Embassy in Korea.
  • 4.        No extension of program beyond the 18-month program duration will be permitted.

8.       Monitoring of Participants and Participant Support

  • a.       Within 10 days of the arrival in the United States, interns are required to notify the sponsor of their arrival, their U.S. residential address, and confirm that they have begun their program. After receiving the participants’ information, the sponsor must validate the participant’s SEVIS record to reflect the current U.S. address and primary site of activity.
  • b.       Sponsors shall contact each participant and the language instruction provider within the first 30 days of arrival in the U.S. to monitor participant satisfaction and re-confirm participants’ current U.S. address. 
  • c.       Sponsors shall continue to contact participants and host organizations every 30 days thereafter throughout the duration of their participation in the sponsor’s program.
  • d.       Sponsors shall promptly update SEVIS with any changes of U.S. address or approved changes of site of activity. Sponsors are reminded to identify the “primary” site of activity in the event the participant has multiple sites.
  • e.       Sponsors must develop procedures for evaluating all interns. All required evaluations must be completed prior to the conclusion of an internship program, and the intern and his/her immediate supervisor must sign the evaluation form. For internship programs exceeding six months’ duration, at a minimum, midpoint and concluding evaluations are required. For programs of six months or less, at a minimum, a concluding evaluation is required.
  • f.         Sponsors are to update SEVIS records by using the "End the Program for EV" for a participant who leaves the program (without incident) prior to the expiration of the Program End Date by entering an effective date of completion (SEE: User Manual for Exchange Visitor Program Sponsor Users (RO/ARO) of SEVIS: Volume II, Sec. 2.7.1.4). This will ensure that the participant is not negatively impacted.
  • g.        Program terminations will continue to be completed as stipulated by the regulations.
  • h.       All other Intern Program regulations apply.

Camp Counselor

1.       Participants

a.       Camp Counselors must be:

  • i.      Sufficiently proficient in the English language to supervise and interact with American youth;
  • ii.      A foreign post-secondary student, youth worker, teacher or individual with specialized skills; and
  • iii.      At least 18-years-old.

2.       Benefits

a.       Financial value: 

i.      Participants receive pay and benefits commensurate with those offered to their American counterparts at the camps.

3.       More information

a.       Camp Counselors will occasionally have to:

i.      Perform non-counseling duties as part of camp life, but not serve as “staff.”

ii.      For example, they cannot serve as administrator personnel, cooks or menial laborers such as dishwashers or janitors.

4.       Program Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to:

  • i.      Conduct an in-person interview;
  • ii.      Secure references regarding suitability;
  • iii.      Ensure that participants have the required health insurance coverage;
  • iv.      Provide participants, prior to departure for the United States, with information on their duties and responsibilities as a camp counselor, contractual obligations relative to accepting a camp counselor position and information on financial compensation;
  • v.      Maintain SEVIS records;
  • vi.      Provide the sponsors 24/7 immediate contact telephone number;
  • vii.      Monitor participants throughout their stay and provide assistance as needed; and
  • viii.      Provide the Department of State’s toll-free emergency hotline telephone number to all participants.

b.       Sponsors must ensure the following:

  • i.      Eligibility: Must be at least 18-years-old, proficient in spoken English and a bona fide youth worker, student, teacher or other specially qualified individual.
  • ii.      Financial Compensation: Camp counselors must receive pay and benefits commensurate with those offered to their American counterparts at the camps.

5.       Employers

a.       Employers are required to:

  • i.      Provide pay and benefits commensurate with those offered to their U.S. counterparts; and
  • ii.      Ensure that program participants do not serve as “staff” — including (but not limited to) administrative personnel, cooks or menial laborers such as dishwashers or janitors.

Au pair and Educare

1.       Participants

a.       Au Pairs must be:

  • i.      Proficient in spoken English;
  • ii.      A secondary school graduate or equivalent; and
  • iii.      Between 18-and-26-years-old.
  • iv.      Capable of fully participating in the program as evidenced by the satisfactory completion of a physical.
  • v.      Personally interviewed, in English, by an organizational representative who shall prepare a report of the interview which shall be provided to the host family; and
  • vi.      Successful in passing a background investigation that includes verification of school, three, non-family related personal and employment references, a criminal background check or its recognized equivalent and a personality profile. Such personality profile will be based upon a psychometric test designed to measure differences in characteristics among applicants against those characteristics considered most important to successfully participate in the au pair program.

2.       Benefits

  • a.       Host Family Stay: Live with a family for 12 months, with the option to extend 6, 9, or 12 more months.
  • b.       Professional Training: Receive a minimum of 32 hours of childcare training before you start.
  • c.       Childcare Experience: Provide up to 10 hours a day/45 hours a week of childcare.
  • d.       School Credit: Complete at least six hours of academic credit or equivalent in formal educational settings at an accredited U.S. post-secondary educational institution.
  • e.       Financial Value: Receive up to $500 toward the cost of required academic course work. Room and board plus compensation for childcare work.

3.       Sponsors are required to:

  • a.       Screen and select both host families and au pairs as program participants according to selection criteria stated in the regulations;
  • b.       Provide au pairs with training in child development and child safety prior to their placement with a host family; and
  • c.       Provide an orientation upon arrival in the United States that includes comprehensive information on life in the United States (see “more information” below)
  • d.       Be transparent about fees, housing, representations and disclosures and provide an itemized list of all fees to be paid and a description of other costs that an au pair will likely incur while in the United States
  • e.       Monitor au pair participation throughout the program, including the physical location, progress, and welfare of the au pair
  • f.        File a program-specific management review to the State Department, so that the Department can regularly review internal controls and program compliance

4.       Sponsors must ensure the following:

  • a.       Eligibility: Must be 18-to-26-years-old, proficient in spoken English and must complete at least six hours of academic credit or its equivalent at an accredited U.S. post-secondary educational institution.
  • b.       Work hours: Childcare is limited to no more than 10 hours per day, and to a maximum of 45 hours per week.
  • c.       Childcare Experience: Provide up to 10 hours a day/45 hours a week of childcare.
  • d.       Financial Compensation: Au pairs are compensated for their work according to the Fair Labor Standards Act as interpreted and implemented by the U.S. Department of Labor.

5.       Host families are required to:

  • a.       Pay up to $500 toward the cost of the au pair’s required academic course work;
  • b.       Provide an appropriate suitable private room and three meals a day for the au pair;
  • c.       Be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents fluent in spoken English;
  • d.       Pay a weekly minimum stipend based on the program option selected;
  • e.       Give the au pair one complete weekend off each month (Friday evening to Monday morning);
  • f.        Facilitate the care provider’s requirement to enroll in and attend an accredited post-secondary institution to fulfill her Educational Component requirement;
  • g.       Provide a minimum of two weeks paid vacation for each 12 month exchange term (prorated for extension periods of six or nine months), in addition to regular weekly/monthly time off;
  • h.       Include the au pair whenever possible in family meals, outings, holidays and other events; and
  • i.        Host families and Au Pairs must sign an Agreement detailing the au pair’s obligation to provide child care prior to the Au Pair’s placement in the host family’s home. In the event of questions regarding refunds or other adjustments, host families and au pairs should refer to their agreements. The Department of State does not have jurisdiction over contractual obligations.

Intern

1.       Participants

a.       Interns must be foreign nationals:

i.      Who are currently enrolled in and pursuing studies at a foreign degree- or certificate-granting post-secondary academic institution outside the United States; or

ii.      Who have graduated from such an institution no more than 12 months prior to their exchange visitor program start date.

2.       Benefits

a.       Practical Experience: The program bridges the gap between formal education and practical work experience.

3.       Program Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to:

i.      Conduct site visits of host organizations that:

  • 1.       Have not previously participated successfully in the sponsor’s program;
  • 2.       Have fewer than 25 employees; and
  • 3.       Have less than $3 million in annual revenue.

ii.      Collect the following information from all host organizations:

  • 1.       Employer Identification Number (EIN);
  • 2.       Verification of telephone number, address, brochures, website, etc.; and
  • 3.       Proof of Worker’s Compensation Insurance Policy.

b.      Sponsors must ensure the following:

c.       Participants in programs that exceed six months must be evaluated at midpoint and at the conclusion of the program; and

d.       For programs with durations of less than six months, an evaluation is required at the conclusion of the program. All evaluations must be received by the sponsoring organization prior to the end of the participant’s exchange program and must be signed by both the participant and his or her immediate supervisor.

4.       Employers

a.       Hosts are required to:

  • i.      Sign a completed Form DS–7002 – Training/Internship Placement Plan (T/IPP) to verify that all placements are appropriate and consistent with the objectives of the interns as outlined in their program applications and as set forth in their T/IPPs. All parties involved in internship programs should recognize that interns are seeking entry-level training and experience. Accordingly, all placements must be tailored to the skills and experience level of the individual intern;
  • ii.      Notify sponsors promptly of any concerns about, changes in or deviations from T/IPPs during training and internship programs and contact sponsors immediately in the event of any emergency involving trainees or interns;
  • iii.      Abide by all federal, state and local occupational health and safety laws;
  • iv.      Abide by all program rules and regulations set forth by the sponsors, including the completion of all mandatory program evaluations;
  • v.      Have sufficient resources, plant, equipment and trained personnel available;
  • vi.      Provide continuous on-site supervision and mentoring by experienced and knowledgeable staff; and
  • vii.      Ensure that interns obtain skills, knowledge, and competencies through structured and guided activities such as classroom training, seminars, rotation through several departments, on-the-job training, attendance at conferences and similar learning activities, as appropriate in specific circumstances.

International Visitor

1.       Participants

a.       International visitors must be:

  • i.      Selected by the United States Department of State;
  • ii.      Engaged in consultation, observation, research, training or demonstration of special skills; and
  • iii.      A recognized or potential leader in a field of specialized knowledge or skill.

2.       Benefits

a.       Cultural understanding:

i.       Recognized or potential foreign leaders participate in observation tours, discussions, consultations, professional meetings, conferences, workshops and travel as a way to better understand U.S. culture and society and contribute to a better knowledge of foreign cultures in the United States.

3.       More information

a.       The international visitor shall be authorized to participate in the Exchange Visitor Program for the length of time necessary to complete the program, which shall not exceed one year;

b.       International Visitors are selected by the U.S. Department of State.

4.       Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to provide International Visitors with:

i.      A summary of the significant components of the program.

Physician

1.       Participants

a.       Alien Physicians must:

  • i.      Have adequate prior education and training to participate satisfactorily in the program for which they are coming to the United States;
  • ii.      Be able to adapt to the educational and cultural environment in which they will be receiving their education and training;
  • iii.      Have the background, needs and experiences suitable to the program;
  • iv.      Have competency in oral and written English;
  • v.      Have passed either Parts I and II of the National Board of Medical Examiners Examination, the Foreign Medical Graduate Examination, Step I and Step II, or the Visa Qualifying Examination (VQE) prepared by the National Board of Medical Examiners, administered by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates;
  • vi.      Provide a statement of need from the government of the country of their nationality or last legal permanent residence. Providing written assurance to the Secretary of Health and Human Services that there is a need in that country for persons with the skills the alien physician seeks to acquire and the alien physician has filed a written assurance with the government of this country that he/she will return upon completion of the training; and
  • vii.      An agreement or contract from a U.S. accredited medical school, an affiliated hospital or a scientific institution to provide the accredited graduate medical education, signed by the alien physician and the official responsible for the training.

b.      Benefits

i.      School credit: 

1.       Graduate medical education or training in a specialty or subspecialty occupation.

c.       More information

i.      Non-clinical exchange participants must have:

  • 1.       A designated United States university or academic medical center may issue an alien physician a Form DS-2019 to enable them to come to the United States for the purpose of observation, consultation, teaching or research if the sponsor signs and appends to the Form DS-2019 a certification which states, “this certifies that the program in which…is to be engaged is solely for the purpose of observation, consultation, teaching or research and that no element of patient care is involved;” or
  • 2.       The dean of the involved accredited U.S. medical school or his designee must certify the following five points:
  • 3.       The program is predominantly observation, consultation, teaching or research;
  • 4.       Any incidental patient contact will be under the direct supervision of a U.S. citizen or resident alien who is licensed to practice medicine in the State in which the activity is taking place;
  • 5.       The foreign national physician will not be given final responsibility for the diagnosis and treatment of patients;
  • 6.       Any activities will conform fully with the State licensing requirements and regulations for medical and health care professionals in the State in which the program is being pursued; and
  • 7. Any experience gained will not be creditable towards any clinical requirements for medical specialty board certification.

Professor and Research Scholar

1.       Participants

a.       Professor and Research Scholars must:

  • i.      Not be a candidate for a tenure track position;
  • ii.      Not have participated in and completed a professor or research scholar program within the last 24 months preceding the beginning date of their new program’s commencement;
  • iii.      Not have participated in a J-Visa program for all or part of the 12-month period immediately preceding the start date of a professor or research scholar program unless they meet one of the following exceptions:
  • 1.       The participant is currently in a professor or research scholar program and is transferring to another institution in the United States to continue their current J-1 program;
  • 2.       The participant’s prior physical presence in the U.S. on a J-visa program was less than six months in duration; and
  • 3.       The prior participation was as a short-term scholar.

2.       Benefits

a.       Educational enrichment: Scholars facilitate the exchange of ideas and research in a variety of fields between people of the United States and people of other countries.

3.       More Information

a.       Professor

i.      The professor category is for a foreign national who enters the United State for the primary purpose of teaching, lecturing, observing or consulting at accredited post-secondary academic institutions, museums, libraries or similar types of institutions. A professor may also conduct research, unless disallowed by the sponsoring organization.

b.       Research Scholar

  • i.      This category is for a foreign national who enters the United States for the primary purpose of conducting research, observing or consulting in connection with research projects at research institutions, corporate research facilities, museums, libraries, post-secondary accredited academic institutions, or similar types of institutions. A research scholar may also teach or lecture, unless disallowed by the sponsor.
  • ii.      The research scholar or professor’s appointment to a position shall be temporary, even if the position itself is permanent.
  • iii.      Incidental lectures or short-term consultations are permitted with the approval of the responsible officer so long as they are directly related to the objectives of the participant’s program, and do not delay the exchange program’s completion date.

Short Term Scholar

1.       Participants

a.       Short-Term Scholars must:

i.      Be a professor or research scholar or someone with similar education and or experience.

b.      Benefits

i.      Educational enrichment:

1.        Participants collaborate on special research projects, teach a semester at a college or university, or lecture, consult or observe in a variety of settings in education and research in the United States.

c.       More information

  • i.      The maximum duration of stay is six months;
  • ii.      No program extension will be considered; and
  • iii.      No change of category will be considered.

2.       Program Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to:

  • i.      Screen and select qualified foreign nationals to carry out exchange initiatives;
  • ii.      Monitor the visitor’s stay while in the United States and assist with any issues that may occur;
  • iii.      Ensure that the foreign national is successfully carrying out the responsibilities for which entry to the United States was granted;
  • iv.      Ensure that exchange visitors are involved in cross-cultural programs where they can learn about the United States and its people;
  • v.      Maintain SEVIS records;
  • vi.      Ensure that the exchange participants and his/her dependents, if any, are covered by health insurance; and
  • vii.      Ensure that exchange visitors have sufficient finances to participate in the program and to support their spouse and dependents, if any.

Specialist

1.       Participants

a.       Specialists must:

  • i.      Be experts in a field of specialized knowledge or skill;
  • ii.      Seek to travel to the United States for the purpose of the interchange of knowledge and skills among foreign and American specialists by observing, consulting or demonstrating their special knowledge or skills; and
  • iii.      Not fill a permanent or long-term position of employment while in the United States.

2.       Benefits

a.       Educational enrichment:

i.       Participants experience an interchange of knowledge and skills among foreign and American specialists who are defined as experts in a field of specialized knowledge.

b.      Limitations

i.      The maximum duration of this program is one year.

c.       More information

i.      This category is for foreign nationals who are experts in a field of specialized knowledge or skill, coming to the United States for observing, consulting, or demonstrating their special skills, except:

Student, College/University

1.       Participants

a.       College/University Students must:

  • i.      Be financed directly or indirectly by the U.S. government, the government of their home country, an international organization of which the United States is a member by treaty or statute, or supported substantially by funding from any source other than personal or family funds;
  • ii.      Be carried out according to an agreement between the U.S. government and a foreign government, or according to a written agreement between American and foreign educational institutions, an American educational institution and a foreign government or a state or local government in the United States and a foreign government; or Student is participating in a student internship program that will fulfill the educational objectives for the student’s degree program in his or her home country; or
  • iii.      Pursue a non-degree program must be enrolled full-time in a prescribed course of study. The maximum duration of a non-degree program is 24 months inclusive of academic training.

2.       Benefits

  • a.       School Credit: University/college students may engage in degree-granting programs until completion or non-degree granting programs for no more than 24 months.
  • b.       Employment: Students may engage in part-time employment under certain conditions, including good academic standing at their host institution.
  • c.       Academic training: Students may participate in academic training with or without wages or other remuneration during their studies with the approval of the academic dean or adviser and the responsible officer at their sponsor organization.

Student School Secondary

1.       Participants

a.       Secondary Students must:

  • i.      Be at least 15 years of age, but not more than 18 years and six months of age as of the program start date, or
  • ii.      Not have finished more than 11 years of primary and secondary school, not including kindergarten; and
  • iii.      Not have previously participated in a secondary school student academic year or semester exchange program or attended school in the United States in either F-1 or J-1 status.

2.       Benefits

  • a.       Extracurricular Experiences: Students may take part in school sanctioned and sponsored extra-curricular activities, including after school sports programs.
  • b.       Accommodations: Students live with an American host family or at a U.S. boarding school.

3.       More information

  • a.       Students may take part in school activities, including after school sports programs. The school district and the state office in charge of deciding athletic eligibility must approve the exchange student’s participation. Students may not work part-time or full-time jobs. However, they may accept occasional work, like yard work or baby-sitting. Exchange students are not allowed to live with relatives.
  • b.      Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary G. Kevin Saba’s Secondary School Student Host Family Appreciation Letter (May 2016) (PDF)
  • c.       Secondary School Student Participant Welcome Letter (May 2016) (PDF)

4.       Program Sponsors

a.       When screening potential host families, sponsors will:

  • i.      Provide potential host families with a detailed summary of the exchange visitor program and the duties and obligations of a host family’s participation;
  • ii.      Request a detailed summary and profile of the host family, the physical home environment, family’s composition and community environment;
  • iii.      Conduct in-person interviews with all family members residing in the home;
  • iv.      Request two personal references for the host family from the school or community to attest to the host family’s good reputation and character;
  • v.      Ensure that the host family has adequate financial resources to host the student; and
  • vi.      Verify that each member of the host family who is 18 and older has undergone a criminal background check.

b.      Sponsors must ensure the following for participants:

  • i.      Local coordinators are assigned to participants to monitor their program and assist with any issues during their stay in the United States;
  • ii.      No more than two foreign secondary school students may be placed in a host family home, and can only be placed if all regulatory requirements are met: Students are not from the same countries or have the same native language. Written approval from the students, written approval from the student’s natural parents, written acceptance of two students by the host family, etc; and
  • iii.      Exchange students are not permitted to reside with relatives.

5.       Hosts

  • a.       Host families are required to:
  • b.       Provide a bed, adequate storage space for clothes and personal belongings, reasonable access to bathroom facilities and study space if not otherwise available in the home;
  • c.       Three quality meals a day; and
  • d.       Transportation to and from school activities.
  • e.       Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary G. Kevin Saba’s Secondary School Student Host Family Appreciation Letter (May 2016) (PDF)

Summer Work Travel

1.       Participant

a.       Summer Work Travel Students must be:

  • i.      Sufficiently proficient in English to successfully interact in an English speaking environment;
  • ii.      Post-secondary school students enrolled in and actively pursuing a degree or other full-time course of study at an accredited classroom based, post-secondary educational institution outside the United States;
  • iii.      Have successfully completed at least one semester or equivalent of post-secondary academic study; and
  • iv.      Pre-placed in a job prior to entry unless from a visa waiver country.

2.       Benefits

a.       The Summer Work Travel program provides foreign students with an opportunity to live and work in the United States during their summer vacation from college or university to experience and to be exposed to the people and way of life in the United States.

3.       Program Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to:

 i.      Provide pre-arranged and fully-vetted employment to all participants who are not from a visa waiver country. Provide all participants, prior to entry:

  • 1.       A copy of the Department of State Summer Work Travel Program Brochure;
  • 2.       The Department of State’s toll-free emergency hotline telephone number;
  • 3.       The sponsor’s 24/7 immediate contact telephone number;
  • 4.       Information advising participants of their obligation to notify their sponsor when they arrive in the United States and to provide information of any change in jobs or residence; and
  • 5.       Information concerning any contractual obligations related to participants’ acceptance of paid employment in the United States, if pre-arranged.

ii.      Sponsors of participants who are nationals of Visa Waiver Program countries must:

  • 1.       Ensure that participants entering the United States without prearranged employment have sufficient financial resources to support themselves during their search for employment;
  • 2.       Provide such participants with information on how to seek employment and secure lodging in the United States before they depart their home countries; and
  • 3.       Provide participants with a job directory that includes at least as many job listings as the number of participants in their program who are entering the United States without prearranged employment.

iii.      Sponsors must undertake reasonable efforts to secure suitable employment for participants unable to find jobs on their own after one week;

 iv.      Sponsors must inform program participants of Federal Minimum Wage requirements and ensure that, at a minimum, participants are compensated at the prevailing local wage, which must meet the higher of either the applicable state or the Federal minimum wage requirement, including payment for overtime in accordance with state-specific employment; and

v.      Sponsors must maintain, at a minimum, a monthly schedule of personal contact with the program participants (in-person, by telephone or via-electronic mail), document such contact, and ensure that issues affecting the health, safety and welfare of participants are addressed immediately.

4.       Employers

a.       Host employers are required to:

  • i.      Provide participants the number of hours of paid employment per week as identified on the job offer and agreed to when the sponsor vetted the jobs;
  • ii.      Pay those participants eligible for overtime worked in accordance with applicable state or federal law;
  • iii.      Notify sponsors promptly when participants arrive at the work site and begins their programs; when there are any changes or deviations in the job placements during the participants’ programs; when participants are not meeting the requirements of job placements; or when participants leave their position ahead of their planned departure; and
  • iv.      Contact sponsors immediately in the event of any emergency involving participants or any situation that impacts the health, safety or welfare of participants.

Teacher

1.       Participants

  • a.       Teachers must:
  • b.       Meet the qualifications for teaching in primary or secondary schools in their country of nationality or last legal residence;
  • c.       Be working as a teacher in the home country or country of legal residence at the time of application, or, if not working as a teacher, otherwise meet the eligibility qualifications and (a) have recently (within 12 months of application) completed an advanced degree and (b) have two years of full-time teaching experience within the past eight years;
  • d.       Have a degree-equivalent to a U.S. bachelor’s degree in either education or the academic subject field in which they intend to teach;
  • e.       Have a minimum of two years (24 months) of teaching or related professional experience;
  • f.        Satisfy the standards of the U.S. state in which they will teach;
  • g.       Be of good reputation and character;
  • h.       Be seeking to enter the United States for the purpose of full-time teaching as a teacher of record at a primary (including pre-kindergarten) or secondary accredited educational institution in the United States (pre-kindergarten teachers must teach full-time, and at the pre-kindergarten level, may teach only language immersion at an accredited host school);

i.         Possess sufficient proficiency in the English language.

2.       Benefits

a.       Educational and cultural enrichment:

i.      Exchange teachers sharpen their professional skills and participate in cross-cultural activities in schools and communities, and they return to their home school after the exchange to share their experiences and increased knowledge of the United States and the U.S. educational system.

b.      Repeat participation

i.      Teachers are eligible to repeat the program provided that they have resided outside the United States for two years and continue to meet the eligibility requirements.

3.       Participants

a.       Teachers must:

  • i.      Meet the qualifications for teaching in primary or secondary schools in their country of nationality or last legal residence;
  • ii.      Be working as a teacher in the home country or country of legal residence at the time of application, or, if not working as a teacher, otherwise meet the eligibility qualifications and (a) have recently (within 12 months of application) completed an advanced degree and (b) have two years of full-time teaching experience within the past eight years;
  • iii.      Have a degree-equivalent to a U.S. bachelor’s degree in either education or the academic subject field in which they intend to teach;
  • iv.      Have a minimum of two years (24 months) of teaching or related professional experience;
  • v.      Satisfy the standards of the U.S. state in which they will teach;
  • vi.      Be of good reputation and character;
  • vii.      Be seeking to enter the United States for the purpose of full-time teaching as a teacher of record at a primary (including pre-kindergarten) or secondary accredited educational institution in the United States (pre-kindergarten teachers must teach full-time, and at the pre-kindergarten level, may teach only language immersion at an accredited host school);
  • viii.      Possess sufficient proficiency in the English language.

4.       Benefits

a.       Educational and cultural enrichment:

i.      Exchange teachers sharpen their professional skills and participate in cross-cultural activities in schools and communities, and they return to their home school after the exchange to share their experiences and increased knowledge of the United States and the U.S. educational system.

b.      Repeat participation

1.       Teachers are eligible to repeat the program provided that they have resided outside the United States for two years and continue to meet the eligibility requirements.

5.       Program Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to:

  • i.      Screen and select qualified foreign teachers based on qualifications and also based on who can make a contribution to the education of students in the United States and who want to learn U.S. teaching methods;
  • ii.      Verify each teacher applicant’s English language proficiency through recognized language tests or interviews;
  • iii.      Monitor the exchange teachers’ stay in the United States to ensure that they are satisfactorily performing their teaching responsibilities, and;
  • iv.      Ensure each exchange teacher completes a cultural activity component annually, which includes two requirements:

1.       First, each exchange teacher must complete, within the United States and during each year of program participation, an activity for the teacher’s classroom, larger host school or host school district population, or the community at large that gives an overview of a cultural aspect of the teacher’s home country.

2.       Second, an activity that involves U.S. student dialogue with schools or students in another country, preferably the teacher’s home country.

b.      Sponsors must provide participants with the following information:

  • i.      The duration and location(s) of the participants’ program;
  • ii.      A summary of the significant components of the program, including fees and costs of the program, a written statement of the teaching requirements and related professional obligations; and
  • iii.      A written statement that clearly indicates the compensation package to be provided to the exchange visitor teacher and any other financial arrangements relevant to the program.

6.       Host/Employers

a.       Hosts/employers are required to:

  • i.      Involve exchange teachers in school and community cultural activities; and
  • ii.      Monitor the performance of exchange teachers in the classroom and in carrying out official responsibilities.

b.      Extensions

  •  i.      The base period for a teacher exchange is three years. However, host schools may apply to the sponsor for a one or two year extension of the exchange (the extension must be for whole years, not fractions of years). Extension requests are not automatic, but there is no limit on the number of extensions that the State Department can grant.
  • ii.      Sponsors must submit extension requests they approve and any supporting documentation to support the extension to the State Department no later than three months prior to the beginning of the desired extension period for the teacher.

Trainee

1.       Participant

a.       A trainee must be a foreign national who:

i.      Has a degree or professional certificate from a foreign post-secondary academic institution and at least one year of prior related work experience in his or her occupational field outside the United States; or

ii.      Has five years of work experience outside the United States in the occupational field in which they are seeking training

b.       Benefits

i.      Practical Experience: Enhance the skills and expertise of exchange visitors in their academic or occupational fields through participation in a structure and guided training-based program.

2.       Program Sponsors

a.       Sponsors are required to:

i.      nduct site visits of host organizations that:

  • 1.       Have not previously participated successfully in the sponsor’s program;
  • 2.       Have fewer than 25 employees;
  • 3.       Have less than $3 million in annual revenue.

ii.      Collect the following information from all host organizations:

  • 1.       Employer Identification Number (EIN)
  • 2.       Verification of telephone number, address, brochures, website, etc.; and
  • 3.       Proof of worker’s compensation insurance policy or equivalent.

 

b.      Sponsors must ensure the following for participants:

  • i.      Participants in programs that exceed six months must be evaluated at mid-point and at the conclusion of the program;
  • ii.      For programs with durations of less than six months, the participant must be evaluated at the conclusion of the program. All evaluations must be received by the sponsoring organization prior to the end of the participant’s exchange program and must be signed by both the participant and his or her immediate supervisor;
  • iii.      Ensure that trainees are appropriately selected, oriented, supervised and evaluated;
  • iv.      Be available to trainees to assist as facilitators and information resources; and
  • v.      Ensure that the training program is full-time (at least 32 hours a week).

3.       Hosts

a.       Host Organizations are required to:

  •  i.      Sign a completed Form DS–7002 to verify that all placements are appropriate and consistent with the objectives of the trainees or interns as outlined in their program applications and as set forth in their T/IPPs;
  • ii.      Notify sponsors promptly of any concerns about, changes in or deviations from T/IPPs during training and internship programs;
  •  iii.      Contact sponsors immediately in the event of any emergency involving trainees or interns;
  • iv.      Abide by all federal, state and local occupational health and safety laws;
  • v.      Abide by all program rules and regulations set forth by the sponsors, including the completion of all mandatory program evaluations;
  • vi.      Have sufficient resources, plant, equipment and trained personnel available;
  • vii.      Provide continuous on-site supervision and mentoring by experienced and knowledgeable staff; and
  • viii.      Ensure that trainees obtain skills, knowledge, and competencies through structured and guided activities such as classroom training, seminars, rotation through several departments, on-the-job training, attendance at conferences and similar learning activities, as appropriate in specific circumstances.